Are you a good boss?

When you take the big decision to set up a UK company, you will be managing a diverse range of workers from many different backgrounds. So, what makes a good boss?

Lead by example
Employees have far greater respect for a boss who walks the walk rather than merely just talks the talk. After all, where’s your credibility if your staff feel unable to ask you for guidance and help in times of crisis. Always seek to lead by example.

Honesty and integrity
No one likes working for a boss who misleads clients and tries to rip them off. Always demonstrate honesty and integrity in all your dealings with customers and staff. This will gain the trust and respect of your workers who will treat you and your company in the same way.

Listen and ask
Two-way communication is vital for a good staff/management relationship. Ask your employees what they think about new projects, software systems or product design.

Inclusion in management decisions and research enhances an individual’s sense of value to the company and you may well receive some extremely useful and constructive feedback. Make sure that you keep everyone in the loop about new developments, changes in company policy and the like. Employees do not like being kept in the dark about matters concerning their future!

Empower your workers
No-one likes to feel powerless; a good boss allows his staff a little discretion and flexibility. Be prepared to step in with discreet correction if necessary and avoid being heavy handed with your directions and instructions. Allow your staff a little scope to make decisions and solve problems and you’ll be pleasantly surprised with how much they appreciate the freedom.

The right toolkit
No-one can perform a role to their absolute best if they don’t have the right tools for the job. It’s vital that staff have the correct procedures in place such as the right software and systems, appropriate hardware and training. Being adequately equipped helps to build confidence which can only improve performance and boost staff morale.

Give and take
If you allow your staff a degree of flexibility and understanding when you deal with domestic emergencies and personal issues, they will repay you with loyalty a thousand times over. On that occasion when you need to ask them to work late to meet an important order, they won’t hesitate to help you out because you did the same for them.

Help your business achieve success
Ask yourself: if I were looking for a job, would I want one with this company working for this boss? If the honest answer to that is ‘yes’, you’re on the right lines. However, if you’re looking for help with your people management, contact us at Goodwille. We’re here to help with a range of services for those looking to set up a UK company or to help their business achieve expansion success.

HR tips: how to manage your remote employees

With over four million UK workers now regularly working for home, it seems businesses are slowly coming round to the benefits of allowing their employees to work remotely. But, with distractions aplenty, no pressure to be productive and a lack of supervision, how do you ensure flexibility works out for both the staff and the business?

Here are four top tips for managing your remote workers:

1. Set overarching goals
When employees are present in the office, it’s easy to keep an eye on their workflow and what they’re achieving, whether that’s through regular meetings or informal conversations. Forbes recently reported that 93% of employees are at their most productive when they work from home, but how do you translate this into trackable achievements?

It’s important to set goals to ensure things are getting done, whether on a daily, weekly or monthly basis, but try not to micromanage. After all, if you can’t trust the person to do their job, what are you letting them work from home for?

2. Make use of technology
There are a plethora of online tools and software applications out there to track where people are up to with tasks and to communicate what needs to be done, so use them!

Whether it’s a ticketing system to allow you to know when a job has been completed, a fully-integrated project management system or simply Skype, communication regarding work doesn’t have to stop just because staff aren’t in the office.

3. Be flexible
In an office, 9 to 5 is the norm and is often unavoidable, but such strict scheduling isn’t always necessary when someone is working from their home office.

If employees are required to be online at these times, make it clear to them, but also outline that hours are flexible if other things need to be prioritised. Your employees will appreciate your acknowledgement that a work/life balance needs to be maintained.

4. Be open
Remote working can be isolating. As well as encouraging staff to make use of co-working spaces and the like, ensure you let them know that you’re approachable and there to listen to any questions or concerns they may have. If possible, set up regular face-to-face meetings or ‘office days’ so workers can meet up and talk things through.

At Goodwille, we can act as HR advisers to keep you up to date with current UK best practice. If you need help and advice on how to manage your remote employees, get in touch with us today.