How did Helsinki reach start-up stardom?

Scandinavia has held a certain chic popularity throughout the rest of Europe for a number of years now, from the Hygge craze to the Swedish and Finnish bakeries popping up around the country, it seems that the UK can’t get enough of Scandinavian culture.

As well as being ahead of the curve on baked goods, Finland have also been excelling in the start-up scene. Over the last five years, Finland has seen at least a one-billion-dollar exit from its start-ups per year, with start-ups in a wide range of fields – from tech to design and education – making their mark globally. Despite being a nation with a population of just under 5.5m, considerably less than that of even London, Finland boasts 10% of the world’s start-up exits.

An up-and-coming tech giant

While Helsinki doesn’t yet compare to the success of Stockholm in the field of technology, they’re not doing too shabbily. They’re home to a number of mobile developers who have created internationally loved mobile games including Rovio, who developed the insanely popular Angry Birds and Supercell, developers of Clash of Clans.

Helsinki also boasts a myriad of tech start-ups that, despite being far from household names just yet, are already proving their worth and ingenuity in their respective fields. Nordic JustEat equivalent Wolt has already expanded from Helsinki to Stockholm and Copenhagen in the past year, and smartphone manufacturer Jolla, founded by ex-Nokia staff – another Finnish tech giant – is making waves and raised $12m in a Series C round last year.

Why Finland?

Finland’s success within the start-up scene over the past decade can at least in part be attributed to a government which supports start-ups while also giving them freedom and independence. Finnish business policies include public support campaigns, dedicated mentor programs and a funding agency for innovation known as Tekes.

Finland is also quick to think internationally. With such a small workforce available at home, Finnish start-ups are some of the first to look outward when business takes off. Helsinki’s super successful start-ups are quick to expand into Europe and beyond, which can quickly catapult these burgeoning businesses to global success.

If you’re looking to expand your start-up business to the United Kingdom, Goodwille can help you with everything you need to get the UK company started and rolling effectively and efficiently. With years of experience helping companies with legal, HR, payroll and financial administration, our team of knowledgeable professionals can guide your UK expansion to success. Get in touch with us today for more information.

Goodwille hosts Launch in London during London Tech Week 2018

Join us on 14 June for Launch in London – London Tech Week’s hottest event for any business establishing in the UK!

Hosted by Goodwille at Level39, one of the world’s most well renowned and connected tech hubs, Launch in London will provide you with everything you need to succeed with your business in London. Get inside tips on the Do’s and Don’ts when starting up in the UK, how to navigate Brexit, the British business culture and how to grow your network with the right people while overlooking London’s skyline.

This is THE event for startups, entrepreneurs and businesses looking to establish in London, as well as for mentors and advisors helping tech businesses succeed on London’s tech scene.

SPEAKERS
Alexander Goodwille, CEO of Goodwille will share the best tips, and the pitfalls to avoid when starting up in the UK.

Mark Leaver, Creative Industries Specialist of DIT – Department for International Trade will discuss why despite Brexit, the UK is still very much open for business and why you should start your business in London during 2018.

Joanna Dodd, Director of Rochester PR will share helpful insights on marketing, PR & how to get connected with the right people in the UK.

Joanna Smit, Owner of SMIT Training will help you understand the British people and culture and provide you with the intercultural skills you need to make your transition in to the UK market.

The seminars will be followed by a Q&A session, drinks, canapes & networking (plus opportunities for panoramic photographs of London!).

EVENTS DETAILS
Date: Thursday 14 June 2018
Time: 10am-1pm
Location: Level39, One Canada Square, Canary Wharf, London E14 5AB
Free entry

REGISTER FOR THE EVENT HERE


If you have any questions about the event, get in touch with our Marketing Manager James Service on james.service@goodwille.com or 020 7795 8100.

Tel Aviv’s startup scene is booming

If you were to ask pretty much any entrepreneur for a list of the best startup cities in the world, you can be pretty confident that list will not only feature Silicon Valley, Stockholm and London, but also Tel Aviv. So why is it that the Israeli city has become a viable destination for companies looking to join the startup revolution?

The best aspects of operating in Tel Aviv

With its growing tech scene and reputation, Tel Aviv has become a bit of a success story. That’s partly down to the fact it has a strong startup ecosystem. Companies and individuals can benefit from easy access to plenty of angel investors as well as capital firms and mentors, and there’s no shortage of talent. In particular, the tech scene has benefited from the large number of highly skilled tech-based individuals within Tel Aviv. Employees tend to know what to do, and don’t require micro-management, which is key for allowing business leaders to focus on growing their company.

The business culture

The business culture in Tel Aviv is one that has become known for its focused and high energy approach, but that doesn’t mean the city fails to embrace fun. In Tel Aviv, the tech scene is looked upon with respect and young people in particular look up to the leaders within it. An important aspect of the business culture in Tel Aviv is that most people are interlinked, meaning it feels that everyone is almost a second-degree friend, or perhaps a colleague of someone you know. Due to the fact Israel is a small country, and most people serve in the army before going to university, the social and professional networks are very much interwoven.

For those looking at Tel Aviv as a possible destination for their own technology startup or expansion, you should be aware that there isn’t really much of a focus on politeness. Instead, people work to overcome a challenge and get tasks done quickly and professionally. Whilst some people find this off-putting, after a while of working within Tel Aviv, many people start to realise the benefits of doing business the Israeli way.

If you need any help with your company expansion plans, whether you want to open a UK office or look somewhere further afield, our extensive support services can help. Talk to Goodwille today about your business plans to get that expansion started.

Edtech – the next big thing?

Fintech has taken the world by storm and revolutionised how we bank.

Its spectacular success is not difficult to explain. Fintech start-ups identified a shift in society, led by consumer demand for innovative digital services. We want things to be easier, more accessible and instant. Fintech start-ups recognised this and took traditional financial services, added a pinch of innovation and a dash of technology, and the future of banking changed forever.

So, what is next?

Just as digitalisation has transformed the financial services industry, it is already beginning to revolutionise education.

Learning models have barely changed since schools began. A teacher stands at the front of the classroom, while students sit and listen, with learning materials being mostly physical textbooks. However, digital technologies are transforming this model. Students are increasingly using computers or tablets, and more and more teachers are using screens to deliver their lessons. Textbooks are being replaced by interactive online services, which are more up to date and in-depth, and which enable students to explore and learn at their own pace, often via distance learning.

Two main factors are driving this change.

Firstly, today’s students are children of the digital revolution and have come to expect the same digital capabilities within their learning environments.

Secondly, digital will soon be the nucleus of every industry, from human resources to healthcare and fashion. Four years from now, the U.K. alone will require 2.3 million digitally skilled workers, while only 10% of schools offer any kind of computer science class. Unless we start exposing learners to technology in the classroom, our skills gap will soon become a chasm.

There are now more than 1,000 edtech startups in Britain, contributing more than £1 billion to the U.K. economy each year. But this is just the tip of the iceberg. Edtech is poised to be the biggest and most profitable digitalised sector yet.

Edtech is also a safe bet for investors. Unlike the ups and downs of the financial markets, education remains constant, sheltered from many of the pressures of the broader geopolitical landscape, and offering a safe haven for smart money from smart investors.

Goodwille sponsors Swedish Chamber event ‘Tech Outside the Box’

Mingling, handshakes, talks and deals – all there when Swedish Chamber patron Goodwille sponsored the annual Entrepreneurship Forum. Showcasing some of the hottest Swedish tech startups, the Tech Outside the Box event was THE event for entrepreneurs, innovators, investors, SMEs and anyone with an interest in the power of Scandinavian innovation in the UK.

Presentations by VC Northzone and Goodwille client Quinyx were followed by a tech exhibition showcasing the startups’ latest work and how they have carved out a unique niche for themselves in their respective industry by thinking outside the box.

“Goodwille focuses on helping innovative Swedish tech businesses who have a big global vision successfully tap into the UK market. When we heard about this event we just had to be part of it. With so much Swedish technology prominent in the UK already, it was great to see the next generation of Swedish tech at it’s early stage of growth.” said James Service, Marketing Executive.

To find out more about how Goodwille can help Swedish businesses successfully expand to the UK, contact marketing@goodwille.com

Is EdTech the next FinTech?

There is no doubting the fact FinTech has taken the world by storm. It has revolutionised the way we bank and it innovated the traditional concepts of financial services. However, with uncertainty surrounding Brexit yet to subside, has EdTech become the bigger and safer investor opportunity?

A huge market

The education market is huge. Yet so far, EdTech has been overshadowed by the opportunities in the FinTech industry. However, the rise of a new education has finally begun, and digitalisation is set to transform education just like it did with the financial industry. According to recent figures, the EdTech market will grow 17 per cent per year by 2020, numbers investors are unlikely to ignore.

A new transformation

For the past 100 years, education models have hardly changed. Mostly, a teacher still stands at the front of a classroom or lecture hall while children and students sit and listen with textbooks and printed documents open on their desks.

However, all of this is set to change. Digital technology is already evident in some classrooms, with more students than ever before using laptops and tablets to enhance their learning experience. Teachers are also using technology to bring their lessons to life and make their classrooms more interactive.

Why is EdTech so important?

The world is quickly becoming more aware of the digital skills gap among society. Soon enough, digital will be at the core of every industry, which is why advances in educational technology have never been more important in order to provide the next generation of students with the skills they need to be successful in any given sector.

EdTech is the next FinTech

There are more than 1,000 EdTech start-ups in Britain alone, and with the financial implications of Brexit still unknown, EdTech is the by far the safest bet for investors. Why? Because it remains constant and is somewhat sheltered from the political landscape. The opportunities it provides are almost endless, and it’s poised to overtake FinTech as the most profitable digitalised sector yet.

For more informationon how Goodwille can support FinTech or EdTech companies starting up in the UK, get in touch.

Sources:
http://techcitynews.com/2016/05/26/report-edtech-spend-will-reach-252bn-2020/

Three unique factors London’s EdTech sector should take advantage of

For any talk of UK tech firms leaving these islands in the wake of the 2016 Brexit referendum, the trend is turning out to be the reverse. Tech firms, and especially EdTech startups, have much to gain from setting up shop in London. This is thanks to a trio of legal, political and social factors unique to Europe’s largest city.

A very, very friendly government
The British government is more often noted for its history than modernity – visiting American politicians have been known to describe the raucous House of Commons as ‘the Pit’. When it comes to Britain’s technology sector, though, ministers know the value of hands-on support. Chancellor Philip Hammond used a recent trade mission to India to fly the flag for British FinTech and EdTech; Business Secretary Sajid Javid has created a Parliamentary Group for Entrepreneurship; and at 2016’s EdTech UK summit, the Department for Education announced plans for a bespoke British EdTech strategy. Opportunities abound for EdTech companies eying expansion to take advantage of ‘UK Plc’.

Global outlook
One of the more popular refrains these days is that Britain is leaving the EU to embrace the world. A dubious claim for many sectors, this may be more true for EdTech. There are a few unique factors that contribute – English is the global language, leading many startups to look to English-speaking countries in the Far East, especially India and Pakistan, as well as in Africa. Also, communities from around the world are well-established in London, giving the city a unique web of connections with the wider world that give the city’s tech scene a global edge. London is the world’s crossroads – what better place to look out for global opportunities and plan international expansion?

Fierce competition between schools
The capital of the UK is also the country’s most competitive educational ecosystem. In part thanks to a drive to raise standards over the last decade or so, London’s schools are a remarkable success story. The legal and political climate is increasingly ‘hands-off’, giving schools the freedom to innovate and compete. This is to say nothing of London’s universities; no city in the world has more top institutions. The competition between these institutions has created a hotbed for EdTech – especially as UK state schools have plenty of freedom to invest in – and experiment with – new technology.

For more information on EdTech, FinTech or how we can support your emerging technology in the UK, contact Goodwille today.

How FinTech start-ups are shaking up the financial industry and what the rest of the world can learn

The UK has long been a suitable place to incorporate a technology start-up. Given that it’s also one of the financial capitals of the world, it was only a matter of time before tech merged with the banking world, and the rapid expansion of numerous FinTech companies is positive proof that Britain’s financial district is slowly but surely being changed by keen young upstarts with their eyes firmly on the prize.

How the United Kingdom helps companies to flourish
The British Government has long had a commitment to helping new tech businesses flourish – help is always forthcoming, regardless of whether the company in question is a start-up or an established international player looking to open a UK office to gain a foothold in emerging industries.

The Financial Conduct Authority is a governing body which works closely with new businesses to help them to understand regulation, and it’s recent scheme – dubbed “Project Innovate” – allows firms to test new models and products in a protected environment.

User friendly financial services
While the governments of other countries could follow the UK’s lead to provide the help needed to get start-ups off the ground, so too could budding entrepreneurs take note of the innovative ways UK FinTech start-ups work with their customers.

Perhaps the largest reason why UK FinTech brands have been so successful is because they’ve understood that their customers require flexibility and mobility. Ultimately, it’s the understanding that a completely digital bank needs to provide a truly flawless user experience in order to succeed.

Instilling consumer confidence
The UK – and London in particular – has long held a reputation for financial services. However, the brand reputation built up by financial institutions over hundreds of years can be yours without having to have a “brick and mortar” base in the country. It’s possible to set up a UK company with a virtual office in the UK and enjoy all the benefits and rewards associated with the capital.

For further information on how opening your business within the UK could transform the fortunes of your start-up, simply contact the friendly, experienced and professional team at Goodwille.

HR tips: how to manage your remote employees

With over four million UK workers now regularly working for home, it seems businesses are slowly coming round to the benefits of allowing their employees to work remotely. But, with distractions aplenty, no pressure to be productive and a lack of supervision, how do you ensure flexibility works out for both the staff and the business?

Here are four top tips for managing your remote workers:

1. Set overarching goals
When employees are present in the office, it’s easy to keep an eye on their workflow and what they’re achieving, whether that’s through regular meetings or informal conversations. Forbes recently reported that 93% of employees are at their most productive when they work from home, but how do you translate this into trackable achievements?

It’s important to set goals to ensure things are getting done, whether on a daily, weekly or monthly basis, but try not to micromanage. After all, if you can’t trust the person to do their job, what are you letting them work from home for?

2. Make use of technology
There are a plethora of online tools and software applications out there to track where people are up to with tasks and to communicate what needs to be done, so use them!

Whether it’s a ticketing system to allow you to know when a job has been completed, a fully-integrated project management system or simply Skype, communication regarding work doesn’t have to stop just because staff aren’t in the office.

3. Be flexible
In an office, 9 to 5 is the norm and is often unavoidable, but such strict scheduling isn’t always necessary when someone is working from their home office.

If employees are required to be online at these times, make it clear to them, but also outline that hours are flexible if other things need to be prioritised. Your employees will appreciate your acknowledgement that a work/life balance needs to be maintained.

4. Be open
Remote working can be isolating. As well as encouraging staff to make use of co-working spaces and the like, ensure you let them know that you’re approachable and there to listen to any questions or concerns they may have. If possible, set up regular face-to-face meetings or ‘office days’ so workers can meet up and talk things through.

At Goodwille, we can act as HR advisers to keep you up to date with current UK best practice. If you need help and advice on how to manage your remote employees, get in touch with us today.

Three Things All EdTech Companies Have In Common

EdTech companies are some of the hottest new enterprises to span two growing sectors: education and technology. They differ considerably in what they offer end users, but they have some important things in common. Here, we examine three key similarities:

1. They all find new ways to do old tasks

At its core, education has been the same for centuries. Yet the way we educate ourselves and others has changed with the advance of new technologies. EdTech companies capitalise on finding new ways to do old tasks, and they do a great job of convincing us to try something novel. Take revision, for example: gone are the days of revision cards getting lost in the bottom of rucksacks; nowadays you can use your smartphone and keep thousands of cards in your back pocket.

2. They all think and work internationally

Education is internationalising and at an increasing rate: more and more schools are venturing overseas to broaden access to their classrooms and EdTech companies need to do the same. Most EdTech companies have international components, international staff and are offering their services to international clients. If you’re not doing so already, now is the time to start thinking about how to make your business appealing to an international audience.

3. They all help to speed up key processes

EdTech companies know that anything that can be done to help speed up some of the core processes in teachers’ and students’ lives can be a fruitful enterprise. Whether it is automatically generating citations or enabling users to sync important documents seamlessly across devices, EdTech companies are finding new and innovative ways to make everyday things easier.

How can Goodwille help EdTech companies?

Here at Goodwille, we have helped over 1,500 companies successfully expand their businesses in the UK since 1997 and today we have an international client base of over 500 companies. We specialise in providing support services, from company legal and financial administration to human resources and virtual offices. To find out what we can do to help your EdTech business, do not hesitate to get in touch with us for friendly, expert advice.