3 main factors to consider when recruiting UK employees

For many UK-based businesses, taking on a new staff member can be a daunting and intricate process. With no reachable source of guidance, it will definitely feel burdensome.

Whether you are planning to launch a startup or expand your international business, employees are critical to the process. Get started on the right foot by attracting the best job seekers and avoid legal consequences due to improper recruitment practices.

Here are 3 key factors to consider when recruiting UK employees:

Know the law

UK employment laws protect both employees and employers, so it’s vital that your HR department knows and understands these laws. By keeping up to date with the legal obligations in the UK, you can easily make sure your recruitment procedure complies with the regulations. Such laws include: anti-discrimination policies, immigration laws, pre-employment checks and many more. It is also vital to know and understand the various post-employment regulations in the UK. If you don’t know the law or fail to comply, it can be detrimental and costly for your business.

Determine your employees’ pay

Always pay the correct rates. From their first day of employment, all employees have the right to be paid at least National Minimum Wage. However, their total pay will likely exceed the national wage to include pensions, travel expenses, loans and meal subsidies.

Also, paying the National Living Wage to your potential workers can help them afford a better standard of living. This is something you need to consider as it motivates employees to perform better.

How you will reach out to quality candidates

Just as vital as it is for HR to understand how job seekers are searching for roles, they must also consider the type of information they seek.

A survey conducted by Glassdoor in May 2018 revealed that online job sites are the leading job source platforms. Therefore, using top job sites facilitates the hiring process as experienced and talented candidates will be able to find and access relevant information about your company.

The study by Glassdoor also highlighted the critical pieces of information UK job seekers are looking for on a job description. These include the salary, the location of the job, and any work-life benefits.

When opening a UK office, quality should also be your top priority. To attract quality candidates, you must be able to tailor your adverts in a manner that entices job seekers and portrays your company in a positive light.

Goodwille is here to support your business with everything related to HR and employment. Check out our HR services and get in touch with us today if you need help with your UK employees!

Brexit – noteworthy dates

Brexit has brought an air of uncertainty for companies operating in and doing business with the United Kingdom.  As no country has left the EU before, no one knows what the process looks like and what impact it will have on businesses. The negotiations are still ongoing and in order to be as prepared as can be, companies are advised to keep an eye on official updates from the European Union and the British government so as to know where to focus efforts.

Below are some noteworthy dates to keep in mind to stay up to date with the latest updates on the Brexit process.

2018

17-18 October

EU summit. The official deadline for setting out the terms to be included in the withdrawal agreement for the “divorce” between the EU and the UK.

End of October

The Withdrawal Agreement is expected to be finalised.

November

EU has suggested this month as the latest a deal can be finalised. However, an exact date has yet to be agreed.

13-14 December

EU summit. This is the fall-back option in case no deal has been reached by October and both sides continue to want to reach an agreement.

 

2019

21 January

If the withdrawal agreement has not been presented by the government on this date, the Members of Parliament (MPs) will be granted powers to influence ministers’ next steps.

21-22 March

The final summit that the UK is expected to attend as a member of the EU.

Before 29 March

The European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill needs to be approved and passed by Parliament to implement the agreement.

26 March at 11:00pm GMT

The UK leaves the EU.

23-26 May

Elections for the European Parliament in 27 EU countries – the UK will no longer be represented.

 

2020

31 December

Expected to be the last date of the transition period

 

Stay up to date on Brexit!

There are many ways you can stay updated about Brexit with Goodwille.

Sign up to our Brexit Newsletter to receive updates and developments of the Brexit negotiations straight to your inbox.

On our Brexit page, we have also consolidated everything discussed about to date to provide you a resource where you can track the developments of the negotiations as they happen.

Additionally, Goodwille has created a committee to monitor the progress of Brexit from a European perspective as well as the UK one. Feel free to contact us if you have any questions about how Brexit will impact your business in or with the UK post-Brexit.


This update is for general guidance only. Specific legal advice should be obtained in all cases. This material is the copyright of Goodwille Limited (unless otherwise stipulated) and is not to be reproduced in whole or in part without prior written consent.

Chequers Plan

The Chequers Plan is a potential agreement presented by the British Government on 12th July 2018. The purpose of the agreement is to retain certain areas of the pre-Brexit arrangements with the European Union and to ensure a smooth transition from EU dependency to Brexit independence.

In the table below, 4 of the main points of the Chequers Plan are outlined and compared to the current agreement applied through the UK’s EU membership.

Current Agreement

Chequers Plan


Free movement permitting UK and EU citizens to work, live and study freely in the UK and EU.
A mobility network terminates the free movement arrangement. In addition, it restricts citizens working, living and studying in the UK and the EU.

The restriction will require for EU citizens to apply to work and/or study in the UK, and vice versa.


Export and import of trade goods and agriculture between the member countries without tariffs and trade barriers.
A common rule book for all goods to secure the trade of goods and agriculture with EU member countries subject to the rules the British Government may choose to implement.

The regulations chosen by the British Government may have trading consequences.


A shared customs union, common agricultural policy and a common fisheries policy ensuring standardised quality and quantity control.
The UK will leave the customs union, common agricultural policy and the common fisheries policy to regain control over these areas, allowing the UK to set its own quotas and price levels.


The European Court of Justice interprets EU law and ensures that the laws are applied equally across all EU member states.
A joint institutional framework will be put in place to interpret UK-EU agreements. In the UK, this would be done by UK courts and, in the EU, this would be done by EU courts.

Any decisions by UK courts would need to take into account the EU laws affecting the Common Rule book.


In summary

The Chequers Plan is intended to provide the UK with an independent trade policy with freedom to implement its own tariffs and trade barriers independently of the EU’s laws. However, the UK will take steps to ensure continuous smooth trade between the UK and the EU by keeping a common rule book.

Further to this, The UK aims to take control over people entering the country to work and study, as well as restore the supremacy of British courts and end the European Court of Justice’s role in UK affairs. Lastly, it seeks to end the annual contributions paid to the EU and reduce these contributions to only be paid for joint actions in specific areas.

If you wish to look into the agreement with greater depth, the following links provide additional information and clarifications of the above:

The future relationship between The United Kingdom and The European Union’, published on 12th July 2018 on gov.uk.

What is the Chequers Deal? Theresa May’s contentious plan explained’ by Simon Rushton, published on 17th October 2018 on inews.co.uk.

What Is the Chequers Brexit Plan? Everything You Need To Know’ by George Bowden, published on 4th September 2018 on huffingtonpost.co.uk.

Chequers Brexit plan explained – what is Theresa May’s EU proposal and will MPs vote against it?’ by Tariq Tahir and Aletha Adu, published on 15th October 2018 on thesun.co.uk.


This update is for general guidance only. Specific legal advice should be obtained in all cases. This material is the copyright of Goodwille Limited (unless otherwise stipulated) and is not to be reproduced in whole or in part without prior written consent.

Nordic Startup Awards announces Goodwille as a strategic UK partner

Press release 3 October 2018.

Clever Nordic businesses have spent the past five years battling it out to be crowned the Nordic Startup Awards, Startup of the Year. The Nordic Startup Awards maps, connects, promotes and celebrates the Nordic startup ecosystem, across all five countries, internally in the region as well as to the rest of the world.

NSAwards are excited to announce Goodwille as their strategic UK based Nordic Partner. Goodwille, whose roots are firmly tied to the Nordic countries have helped hundreds of tech businesses, including regional & national finalists of the Nordic Startup Awards, enter the UK market.

Kim Balle, Co-Founder & CEO of the Nordic Startup Awards says “It’s exciting to have Goodwille onboard as a Nordic Partner. Goodwille have an unrivalled track record of helping Nordic businesses with their expansion to the UK, and their experience will prove invaluable to our entrants and finalists”.

Nordic businesses often look to the UK when expanding outside of the region for the first time, and Goodwille have shared their vast experiences at London Tech Week, Oslo Innovation Week & later this year, SLUSH.

James Service, Marketing Manager of Goodwille says “We’ve been working closely with the Nordic startup scene for over two decades. This partnerships with the Nordic Startup Awards cements our position as the market leader in helping businesses from the Nordic region with their expansion to the UK.”

Over 2,500 companies were nominated for the Nordic Startup Awards in 2018, and the regional finalists received tens of thousands of nominations from across the Nordic countries.

With the five regional finals drawing to a close, the regional winners will battle it out at The Grand Finale in Copenhagen on the 30th October to win one of thirteen awards, including Founder of the Year, Best Accelerator or Incubator & Startup of the Year.

Press Contacts

Kim Balle, Co-Founder & CEO, Nordic Startup Awards
kim@globalstartupawards.com

James Service, Marketing Manager, Goodwille
james.service@goodwille.com

What are the advantages of international expansion?

The benefits of expanding operations into overseas markets are not reserved only for large corporations. Small businesses can tap into them as well, as long as the necessary planning is in place and a patient approach is taken. Particular attention will need to be paid to cultural differences that could necessitate alterations to the ways you do business, but the benefits are there to be seized. Here are some of the key advantages of international expansion.

Untapped markets

Your company may offer services or products that are not available in some parts of the world, where demand is consequently very high. If you expand your operation into markets such as these, you can attract a hungry new customer base with minimum threat of immediate competition. You may even find the nation’s government sweetens the pot with incentives for expanding into their territory, because you’ll help boost their economy and create jobs.

Positive business climate

Other countries may offer superior economic conditions to your own. Recessions or restrictive policies from governments make it hard to turn a profit, and expansion into an area not affected by these things can offer a prosperous alternative. In essence, a new nation could offer a more ‘business-friendly’ economic climate, with advantages like lower taxes or less stringent environmental regulations.

Increased exposure

International expansion increases a business’s exposure, helping to create a global footprint. This can lead to greater brand recognition across the world, and potentially facilitate further expansion in the future. This can also help you gain more respect from customers and businesses in your domestic market as they’re more likely to view you as a major player in your industry.

Breathing new life into your business

It is not only a thriving business that can grow through international expansion; entering overseas markets can help rejuvenate a struggling enterprise. If you are operating in a saturated domestic market, or your market share is shrinking, you may find new outlets for your services or products in a different country. If you depend on certain resources or demands that are in short supply in your home country, you may be able to find exactly what you need overseas.

Goodwille have helped overseas businesses expand into the UK for over 20 years. We have experience helping business with everything from setting up a UK company and ensuring compliance with UK employment law, to help with introducing you to our expensive and international network and bridging any business culture gap. If you want to know more about how we can help your business expand internationally; to the UK or elsewhere, contact us at Goodwille and we’ll tell you more.

Why do startups fail in the first few years?

Surveys show that up to 50% of UK startups fail within five years of commencing in business. Typically startups fail because they run out of cash, but the reasons for this are more complex. The abilities of the entrepreneur or management team could be one factor leading to cash flow failure, other reasons include faulty business plans, slow growth or failure to expand in the correct manner, and entering the market at the wrong time.

Some reasons for the failure of startups

The entrepreneur, or business owner, is most critical to the success of any startup and will be the driving force for the business in its early days. So, it’s important for all entrepreneurs to understand just where their strengths lie and what weaknesses they possess, this way they can run the business by playing in line with their abilities.

The strength of the business operational team is the next more important factor in the success of any startup. Having a strong management team can help improve business plans and ideas, as once the company is up and running the abilities of team members will assist in honing operations and levels of success.

Original products or ideas are absolutely no guarantee of success in business; strong implementation is the key. Many of the best entrepreneurs actually start up their business utilising ideas and business models already in the marketplace. They just make small changes and improvements to streamline the business model and make it more successful.

What is vitally important, though, for any startup is that existing demand for products or services is in place. Many startups fail due to lack of demand, so researching the marketplace and consumer demand is essential prior to starting up in business.

Access to the market can also be a stumbling block for new businesses. This is a particular issue for B2B startups if their business relies upon a lengthy tendering procedure in order to obtain orders. Startups planning to sell to larger corporations and organisations could also fail within the first couple of years due to long sales pipelines, which can be anything up to two years.

Finally, sufficient financing to ensure healthy cash flow during the first couple of years is essential for any new business.

If you’re based overseas and planning a UK startup in any sector of business, get in touch with Goodwille for information about the professional business services we provide to startups.

Expanding into the UK – all you need to know when starting a business in the UK

The UK has been ranked the best location for international businesses looking to expand internationally. Starting a business in the UK as a foreigner can be challenging, but with right set of tools and knowledge, it’s a good place to go for when looking for overseas business opportunities. The global environment, ease of doing business and strong market potential are of interest for overseas companies.

When an international company sets up in the UK, there are a number of registration requirements, regulations and obligations that need to be taken into account. This article highlights the most important things to consider when expanding your business into the UK.

Legal structures for market entry

When setting up in the UK, there are several legal structures to choose from. Depending on your type of business, where you are based and whether you have people on board or not, you may choose amongst many options available. The most common ones are listed below.

  • Limited liability company
  • Branch office
  • Limited liability partnership
  • Sole trader
  • Partnership

Limited liability companies (LTD) are the most common form of business entity in the UK. An LTD is a separate legal entity, owned by shareholders and managed by directors. The profits of a limited company are liable for corporation tax and they are distinct from any tax on the income of the persons who own or run the company. Setting up an LTD company in the UK is a well-recognised structure that is quick and cost-effective to complete. However, a UK law places a number of legal obligations and reporting requirements, which can be time-consuming and complicated.

Another usual method for foreign company is to establish a branch office. As opposed to an LTD, a branch office is not a legal entity from the head office company. However, setting up a UK branch requires Companies House registration and registration with HMRC for direct tax, VAT (Value Added Tax), PAYE (Pay-As-You-Earn) / NIC (National Insurance Contributions) as appropriate. Full responsibility for the operations, debts and liabilities of the UK branch lie on the overseas parent company.

Limited liability partnerships (LLPs) are increasingly used as a tax efficient vehicle for international companies setting up in the UK. An LLP can be formed by two or more people and need to be a lawful, commercial venture that is operating for profit. An LLP is flexible solution particularly when distributing capital and profits, and correctly structured won’t be subject to UK tax. However, a public disclosure is required and the profit can’t be retained in the same way as in LTDs.

Sole trader business is most commonly used when setting up a small business in the UK. It’s the simplest way for a person to trade alone as a self-employed individual without forming a company. Sole trader is easy to set-up and doesn’t require filing information publicly. However, the individual is personally liable for any debts the business might have.

In a partnership, you and your partner(s) personally share responsibility for the business.  Partners share the business’ profits and each partner pays tax on their share. A partner can be any ‘legal person’, such as a Limited Company. Partnerships are generally easy to form, manage and run, and partners are able to share the liabilities of the business. However, the financial risk might be high (even if the responsibility is shared) and disagreements between partners are possible. Also, partners must pay tax in the same way as sole traders by submitting a Self Assessment tax return each year.

Get in touch with Goodwille’s Legal Department to get more information on the most suitable legal structure for your business.

Set-up and registration

A newly incorporated company can be typically registered with the Companies House in 48 hours once all documents are completed. A UK company must register for corporation tax with HMRC, within three months of starting to trade. The paperwork for registration is not too extensive, however, certain statutory documents are required.

Bank account

In order to make any transactions, you’ll need to open a UK bank account for your business. Opening a bank account is a time-consuming process as banks need to go through complicated money laundering requirements to ensure your company is credible for a corporate bank account. Therefore, prepare to have time and patience for this stage, it can easily take up to three months or more to complete.

Check if your bank in the company’s home country has any operations in the UK. In some cases, this might speed up the process, as it may prove some creditworthiness for the business.

If the bank account opening process proves to be longer than excepted, Goodwille can provide a client account which can be used temporarily to make transactions while you wait for your bank account to be opened. Get in touch with our Finance Department to get more information.

Regulations

Starting a business in the UK as a foreigner is a journey full of new opportunities as well as responsibilities. The regulatory system in the UK is very open and transparent, making it easy to do business. In general, the UK aims to minimise bureaucracy and deregulate marketplaces in order to allow companies to develop and expand. However, there are very strict regulations in place that a company needs to be aware of (e.g. with regards to employment, industrial emissions, pollution monitoring and control, and waste disposal). Make sure you are aware of the regulations that directly or indirectly affect your business!

All businesses operating in the UK are subject to the UK law, and every company registered in the UK must have a registered address in the UK. For limited companies, financial transparency is required and annual audited reports must be submitted to the Registry of Britain (Companies House).

In order to keep the business legally running, a UK company must file annual financial statements with Companies House within nine months of the end of an accounting period. Also, an Annual Return must be filed with Companies House every 12 months (within 28 days of the anniversary of incorporation).

To get all the details in order and prepare for the regulatory areas, you should look for specialist advice. Contact Goodwille’s Corporate Legal Department today if you have any questions regarding regulations or your business’ obligations in the UK.

Tax

Foreign businesses looking at overseas business opportunities in the UK will find a competitive and business-friendly tax regime. Companies need to consider their exposure to UK taxation, including corporate income tax, value-added tax (VAT) and employment taxes. Companies that are incorporated in the UK, or foreign companies with central management and control in the UK, are subject to a tax prevailing rates on their worldwide income including ordinary income and capital gains.

Companies may become subject to UK taxation in a number of ways, such as

  • Establishing a formal taxable presence in the UK (via a subsidiary company or permanent establishment).
  • Registering a company for VAT in the UK. Companies must be registered for VAT if their taxable turnover for any 12 months period is £85,000 or over. The current standard VAT rate in the UK is 20%, which is the rate used by most of the businesses.
  • Suffering UK withholding tax at 20% on interest or a royalty income received from a UK resident company.

It’s important to remember that a foreign business operating in the UK doesn’t necessarily create a taxable presence in the UK. In order to be subject to the UK corporation income taxation, an overseas business needs to be trading in the UK through a permanent establishment.

Employment

When employing people in the UK, you need to be aware of several regulations within UK employment law. To start with, make sure your employees have the right to work in the UK (that they hold a valid UK/EU passport or work permit/visa) and see if they have a NIN (National Insurance Number) for the deduction of taxes. Also, remember to follow the guidelines for UK employment contracts and provide these within 8 weeks of starting the employment.

In addition, you need to register you employees into PAYE (Pay-As-You-Earn: social costs of employment including income tax and National Insurance that you as employer needs to pay to HMRC), and organise with company insurances as appropriate. Every employer in the UK must also enrol their employees into the workplace’s pension scheme within three months after the start of the employment.

In terms of the compensation, you must ensure the employees are paid at least according to the National Minimum Wage in the UK. As the recruitment market in the UK is highly competitive, also make sure your remuneration package is attractive enough and fits into the scope of the role.

If you are recruiting in the UK, you may want to turn to specialists who can help you with all the employer regulations and responsibilities you need to consider in the UK. Goodwille’s Human Resource Department deals with these issues daily and are happy to help if you have any questions along your recruitment process. When you are a small business setting up in the UK and not having the same resources than your larger competitors, you may want to invest in professional advice to make the people management processes more effective.

To conclude

UK’s highly potential market provides great opportunities for growing your business, however starting up a business in the UK is a challenging process full of regulations and liabilities. In order to get the set-up processes and ongoing compliance right, it’s good to turn to professionals who are able to provide you with advice  and all the necessary help you need to get your business operations up and running according to UK regulations.

If you are a foreign-owned business looking to expand into the UK, Goodwille can help you to get the inside track. We have been helping Nordic businesses to expand in the UK for 20 years, and are experienced in legal, finance, HR and payroll services in the UK. With a track record of supporting almost 2,000 businesses in the UK, we have extensive experience to help you grow your business. Get in touch with us today, if you are planning to expand to the UK or have any questions regarding the UK market.


Useful contacts for your business

When expanding your business to the UK, there are many organisations you may find useful.

Networking-wise, it’s good to get know your local chamber of commerce and see if their network is worth accessing. For example, Finnish-British Chamber of Commerce and Swedish Chamber of Commerce provide good opportunities for professional networking.

Also, when developing your strategy for the new market, Department of International Trade (DIT) provides free advisory and supports companies with their UK strategy and planning.

Rare Chromosome Disorder Awareness Week

17 – 23 June 2018 is Rare Chromosome Disorder Awareness Week – a week with the important mission to raise awareness about rare chromosome and gene disorders, and to shine a light on the individuals and families affected by these disorders and how for them, rare is normal.

We want to be part in raising awareness and supporting people affected by rare chromosome disorders across the UK, and to do that Team Goodwille is running the British 10K in Westminster, London on 15 July 2018 to raise money for UNIQUE – a charity with the mission to inform and support anyone affected by rare chromosome and gene disorders.

Charity, fundraising and spreading information on important causes are very close to our hearts at Goodwille, and we hope that by raising awareness of rare chromosome and gene disorders and donating to UNIQUE, we can make a difference to individuals and families in the UK.

Help us make a difference – support #TeamGoodwille in the British 10K and donate to our cause. All donations and contributions, however large or small, make a real and lasting difference.

DONATE HERE.

Follow the fundraising journey – from running practise to fundraising activities on Instagram. Thank you for your support.

About UNIQUE

Unique provides much needed help and information to those caring for a family member with a rare chromosome disorder. These lifelong disorders affect 1 in 200 live-born babies and those affected are often sick and severely disabled, unable to walk or talk. For more information see www.rarechromo.org

LAUNCH IN LONDON | Speaker introduction: Alexander Goodwille – Goodwille

London is a great place to be for tech businesses – it has access to great pool of talent, capital and investors, it boosts a large tech community and it’s perfectly located in the middle of time zones. With all these possibilities available – how can businesses and entrepreneurs utilise these to the best extent possible, and what else is needed to succeed?

On 14 June, Goodwille are hosting the event Launch in London as part of London Tech Week. The event targets startups, tech businesses and entrepreneurs with aspirations to launch in London, and will provide insights and expert advice on everything you need to succeed with your tech business in London.

One of the speakers at the event is our very own CEO Alexander Goodwille. If you read our blog on a regular basis, you might already be familiar with Alexander and what we do at Goodwille, but reading the introduction below we’re sure you’ll learn something new about Alexander, the Goodwille family business and why we are hosting Launch in London during London Tech Week!

During Launch in London, Alexander will speak about:

With over twenty years (twenty one to be exact!) experience helping companies expand in the UK, Goodwille have seen many businesses succeed, and also some businesses struggle with their UK operations. Alexander will share his best tips, and the pitfalls to avoid when starting up your business in London. He will provide common mistakes that he has seen over the years and give examples of unpleasant situations you might end up in if you haven’t done your homework!

About Goodwille and why we host Launch in London during London Tech Week 2018

Goodwille help businesses succeed with their UK operation. Founded by Swedish business woman Annika Åman-Goodwille, Goodwille take care of the administration and practical issues associated with running a business in the UK, so businesses can focus on clients and growing their business! Covering five integrated department, including Corporate Legal and Compliance, Finance, People Management and HR, Payroll, and Virtual Office and Meeting Rooms, we provide a solid foundation for you to grow your business.

At Goodwille, we think that startups and entrepreneurs should focus their efforts on value creation instead of admin and trying to learn the systems and requirements to run a UK business, and Tech is one of the most represented industries in our client-base. We want to provide startups, entrepreneurs and tech businesses with not only the administrative support they need to succeed in the UK, but also to give them valuable advice on how to interact with British clients and colleagues, how to make a name of yourself on London’s big tech scene, and also where and how to look for help to maximise your potential. We hope that Launch in London will provide just this to growing businesses, British or foreign, that wish to conquer London in 2018.

About Alexander

Alexander is the Computer Engineer that after 10 years in Investment Banking in March 2017 stepped up as CEO for the family business that his mother had founded 20 years earlier. He has a deep passion for all things tech and entrepreneurial, and he loves seeing people grow and succeed. Growing up in the UK with a Swedish mother and Scottish father and having seen the Goodwille business grow from the first client to nearly 2,000 companies helped to date, he has seen and experienced several culture clashes between cultures that are seemingly similar, but maybe more importantly – he has seen many foreign companies succeed in the UK.

LAUNCH IN LONDON – EVENTS DETAILS

Date: Thursday 14 June 2018
Time: 10am-1pm
Location: Level39, One Canada Square, Canary Wharf, London E14 5AB
Tickets: This event is fully booked, email hello@goodwille.com to be put on the waiting list

LAUNCH IN LONDON | Speaker introduction: Mark Leaver – DIT

London is a great place to be for tech businesses – it has access to great pool of talent, capital and investors, it boosts a large tech community and it’s perfectly located in the middle of time zones. With all these possibilities available – how can businesses and entrepreneurs utilise these to the best extent possible, and what else is needed to succeed?

On 14 June, Goodwille are hosting the event Launch in London as part of London Tech Week. The event targets startups, tech businesses and entrepreneurs with aspirations to launch in London, and will provide insights and expert advice on everything you need to succeed with your tech business in London.

One of the speakers at the event is Mark Leaver, Creative Industries Specialist and Adviser for UK Department for International Trade, DIT. Get to know Mark a bit better and learn what he will bring to the discussion at Launch in London!

About Mark

Mark works with the Department for International Trade as a specialist adviser on the creative and digital media industries, assisting and advising international businesses to make investments and grow their presence in the UK and guiding DIT thinking on the creative technology landscape.

During Launch in London, Mark will speak about:

Starting off by introducing DIT and how they can help foreign businesses in the UK, Mark will talk about opportunity in the UK for inward investment; specific sector growth, focusing on the creative and technology sectors; Brexit (the inevitable topic!) and why despite Brexit, the UK is still very much open for business; and the accelerators and programmes available to help accelerate your business in the UK.

About Department for International Trade

Department for International Trade, DIT, is an international economic department of the UK government, operating to secure UK and global prosperity by promoting and financing international trade and investment, championing free trade. The responsibilities of the Department include bringing together policy, promotion and financial expertise to break down barriers to trade and investment and promoting British trade and investment across the world. This includes helping foreign businesses locate in the UK, as well as helping UK businesses expand overseas.

Website: www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-international-trade

LAUNCH IN LONDON – EVENTS DETAILS

Date: Thursday 14 June 2018
Time: 10am-1pm
Location: Level39, One Canada Square, Canary Wharf, London E14 5AB
Tickets: Grab your free ticket HERE!